Yale MOOC: Age of Cathedrals

Notes for Age of Cathedrals by professor R. Howard Bloch on Coursera (Yale Summer Session).

yale

Duration: 9 weeks

  • Introduction & Saint-Denis I
    • Chapter 1: Origins and Birth of the Age of Cathedrals
    • Chapter 2: The First Cathedral: Saint-Denis
  • Saint-Denis
  • Architectural Innovation
    • Chapter 6: Gothic Versus Romanesque Design
    • Chapter 7: Architectural Innovations in the Age of Cathedrals
  • Notre Dame de Paris
    • Chapter 8: Building Notre Dame
    • Chapter 9: Birth of Christ and the Death of Mary on Notre Dame’s West Façade
    • Chapter 10: Entering Notre Dame to Great Rose Windows
    • Chapter 11: Saint Stephen and the Miracle of Theophilus
  • Intellectual and Everyday Life
  • Our Lady of Chartres
    • Chapter 15: Building Chartres
      • Jehan le Marchant, Miracles de Notre-Dame de Chartres
    • Chapter 16: Chartres’ Royal Portal and The Liberal Arts
    • Chapter 17: Stained Glass at Chartres
    • Chapter 18: Chartres and Charlemagne
  • Cathedrals and Crusades
    • Chapter 19: The Song of Roland
    • Chapter 20: The Sainte-Chapelle in Paris
  • Saints and Kings
  • Conclusion
    • Chapter 25: Cathedrals from the Middle Ages to the Present

Cathedrals

  • Saint-Denis
  • Notre Dame de Paris
  • Beauvais
  • Amiens
  • Chartres
  • Sainte-Chapelle
  • Reims

References

Smarthistory – Gothic architecture, an introduction

 

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Documentaries

Les Temps des Cathédrales (9 episodes) 1978, based on the book from Duby

Le temps des cathédrales de Georges Duby

  1. L’Europe de l’an Mil
  2. La Quête de Dieu
  3. Dieu est Lumière
  4. La Cathédrale, la Ville, l’Ëcole
  5. Louis IX, Rois Chevalier et Saint
  6. Les Nations s’affirment
  7. Le XIVe Siècle
  8. Le Bonheur et la Mort
  9. Vers les Temps Nouveaux

 

 

ND de Paris II

 

https://boutique.arte.tv/detail/defi_des_batisseurs_cathedrale_strasbourg

 Origins and Birth of the Age of Cathedrals

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A period of economic growth between the Viking raids of the 10th century and the Black Death of 1348. It was a period in which the rural economy of the First Feudal Age gave way to a rise of cities: money, commerce, markets, judicial institutions, guilds, universities, and among the most impressive and enduring architectural monuments of the world, Gothic cathedrals.

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Jean Fouquet, The Right Hand of God Protecting the Faithful against the Demons (ca. 1452–1460) from https://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/1975.1.2490/.

The subject is highly unusual, as is the topographically accurate depiction of medieval Paris, in which the cathedral of Notre Dame, the spire of Saint-Chapelle, the Pont Saint-Michel, and other monuments of the Île de la Cité (including the Hôtel de Nesle, where the figures stand) are immediately recognizable.

 

http://mappinggothic.org

Each new city tried to outdo the others in the height of its cathedral. Begun in 1225, Beauvais outdid them all with a choir vault so high, 157 feet, that it collapsed in the year 1284. All the cities adopted the high style of the high wall in the great wave of cathedral building that swept from the Parisian Basin to the rest of France and eventually, to all of Europe.

We should not forget that in an age when few people could read and manuscript books were rare, the churches, which were covered and filled with images from the Old and New Testaments, served as the Bible of the poor. The Age of Cathedrals was also the age of the birth of literature in the vernacular tongues, in French, Italian, German, and English.

Chapter 1: Origins and Birth of the Age of Cathedrals

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Chapter 2: The First Cathedral: Saint-Denis

Suger (1080-1151) – Principal ministre des rois Louis VI le Gros et Louis VII, il est connu surtout par ses ambitions théologiques et artistiques qui le conduisirent à reconstruire la Basilique de Saint-Denis (…) et à donner naissance à l’art gothique. https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suger

 

L’ancienne abbaye royale de Saint-Denis (…) s’élève sur l’emplacement d’un cimetière gallo-romain, lieu de sépulture de saint Denis martyrisé vers 250. Le transept de l’église abbatiale (…) est ainsi la nécropole des rois de France.
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basilique_Saint-Denis

hubert_robert_-_la_violation_des_caveaux_des_rois_dans_la_basilique_de_saint-denis_croped

Hubert Robert – La Violation des caveaux des rois dans la basilique de Saint-Denis 

Chapter 3: A Bible in Stone for the Poor

Chapter 4: Entering the House of God

Chapter 5: Dazzling Light and Rich Objects

Chapter 6: Gothic Versus Romanesque Design

Chapter 7: Architectural Innovations in the Age of Cathedrals

Chapter 8: Building Notre Dame

Chapter 9: Birth of Christ and the Death of Mary on Notre Dame’s West Façade

Chapter 10: Entering Notre Dame to Great Rose Windows

Chapter 11: Saint Stephen and the Miracle of Theophilus

Chapter 12: Peter Abelard and The Birth of the University

Chapter 14: The Fabiliaux: Urban Tales in the Shadow of The Cathedral

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Chapter 15: Building Chartres

Chapter 16: Chartres’ Royal Portal and The Liberal Arts

Chapter 17: Stained Glass at Chartres

Chapter 18: Chartres and Charlemagne

Chapter 19: The Song of Roland (778)

 

Chapter 20: The Sainte-Chapelle in Paris

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Chapter 21: Holy Relics

Chapter 22: The Stained Glass of Sainte-Chapelle

Chapter 23: The Life of Saint Louis

 

Chapter 24: The King Becomes a Relic

Chapter 25: Cathedrals from the Middle Ages to the Present

The history of the Gothic cathedral since their construction in the High Middle Ages for the most part in the 12th and 13th centuries, is a story of destruction, by men and by nature, and restoration.

Restaurer un édifice, ce n’est pas l’entretenir, le réparer ou le refaire, c’est le rétablir dans un état complet qui peut n’avoir jamais existé à un moment donné.

 

 

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